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  24. Trash Track (BalkTalk@MoMA)
  25. Study: Additive Circle
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  47. 2 ½ Years of Vocabulary
  48. Alcatraz: poem by Sharon Olds
  49. Climate Crisis on Djibouti
  50. Real: 9/11/2007
  51. The System: Mapped Out

Trash Track (BalkTalk@MoMA)

“Nobody wonders where, each day, they carry their load of refuse. Outside the city, surely; but each year the city expands, and the street cleaners have to fall farther back. The bulk of the outflow increases and the piles rise higher, become stratified, extend over a wider perimeter”

– Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

SENSEable City Lab's Project Page
http://senseable.mit.edu/trashtrack/

Why do we know so much about the supply chain and so little about the 'removal -chain'?

Imagine a future where immense amounts of trash didn’t pile up on the peripheries of our cities: a future where we understand the ‘removal-chain’ as we do the ‘supply-chain’, and where we can use this knowledge to not only build more efficient and sustainable infrastructures but to promote behavioral change. In this future city, the invisible infrastructures of trash removal will become visible and the final journey of our trash will no longer be “out of sight, out of mind”.

Elaborated by the SENSEable City Lab and inspired by the NYC Green Initiative, TrashTrack focuses on how pervasive technologies can expose the challenges of waste management and sustainability. Can these same pervasive technologies make 100% recycling a reality?

TrashTrack uses hundreds of small, smart, location aware tags: a first step towards the deployment of smart-dust - networks of tiny locatable and addressable microeletromechanical systems.These tags are attached to different types of trash so that these items can be followed through the city’s waste management system, revealing the final journey of our everyday objects in a series of real time visualizations.

The project is an initial investigation into understanding the 'removal-chain' in urban areas and it represents a type of change that is taking place in cities: a bottom-up approach to managing resources and promoting behavioral change through pervasive technologies. TrashTrack builds on previous work of the SENSEable City Lab in its exploration of how the increasing deployment of sensors and mobile technologies radically transforms how we understand and describe cities.

The project has been exhibited at MoMA (2011, BalkTalk), Seattle Public Library (2010) and the Architectural League of New York (2010), and also a recipient of NSF International Schience & Engineering Visualization Challenge (2010, First Place).

Participated as a Designer and Research Fellow, 2009–2010
Project of SENSEable City Laboratory of MIT
Images/Videos courtesy of SENSEable City Laboratory



Earlier project:
Study: Additive Circle

Later project:
Subcurrents